3 BEST WAYS TO JOIN YARN IN CROCHET

3 best ways to join yarn in crochet


 

When I first started knitting, about ten years ago, I remember being so excited by the few basic stitches I had just learned that I decided to throw myself headlong into a somewhat ambitious project for a beginner: a knitted blanket for my newborn daughter. At a certain point in my work, when I was slowly approaching the end of the first ball, I realised that I had not yet learned how to attach a new yarn to the one I was working with! So I had to learn it there and then, with the fear of making mistakes and having to do all the work over again (I still hadn’t learned how to correct mistakes either, at the time).

 

HOW TO JOIN YARN EFFICIENTLY AND INVISIBLY

 

In the meantime, after years of experience, I have learned how to attach a new thread to my work, of course; indeed I have found and experimented with different methods to do it correctly. Over time, though, I realised that my main concern was no longer to learn how to just attach new yarn so much, but to do it in a way that was both EFFECTIVE and INVISIBLE at the same time. "Effective" because the new yarn must be securely joined to the previous one, to ensure that the joint never comes apart, ruining the entire job. "Invisible", so that the joint is not visible inside the work, ruining its aesthetics.

 

MY 3 FAVOURITE WAYS TO JOIN YARN

 

I know that this topic is strongly felt by all crocheter or knitters, and I therefore wondered if there were any joining methods that included both of the characteristics listed above. After trying and experimenting with different ways to join new yarn, picked up here and there on the internet, I came to the conclusion that the 3 best methods ever (for different reasons) are the following:

1. The “KNOT”: the ends of the two yarns are tied with a classic knot. Pros: the joint is absolutely safe; Cons: it is very visible inside the work, especially when using thick yarns.

2. The "SLIDING KNOT": the end of yarn A is tied to yarn B, and the end of yarn B to yarn A, then the threads are pulled together until the two knots meet. Pros: the joint is secure and less visible than with Method 1; Cons: it is more complex to perform and the joint is still minimally visible.

3. "TAPESTRY": the new yarn is incorporated into the texture while working it, without knots. Pros: since there is no joint, it is an absolutely invisible method, and also safe; Cons: it can only be used on a regular texture and with certain stitches. 

What better way to explain these 3 methods than through a video? Here it is: HOW TO JOIN YARN.


And you? Do you use these three methods as well? Or do you think there are better methods? Let me know! I'd love to read about them. 💜



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